IJIS

The International Journal of Iberian Studies

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The scope of IJIS

The International Journal of Iberian Studies (IJIS) is the academic journal for scholars from around the world whose research focuses on contemporary Spain and Portugal from a variety of disciplinary perspectives.

IJIS is interested in:
• history (20th century onwards)
• government and politics
• foreign policy and international relations, including with the European Union
• labour and social movements
• social and welfare policies
• economics and business management
• work and employment
• spatial, urban and regional developments
• regional nationalism and ethnic identities
• feminist thought and gender policies
• education and cultural debates
• media, television, cinema and advertising policies
• tourism, leisure and sports policies and management
• language policy and learning issues.

Research articles for peer review should be innovative with respect to the knowledge base on contemporary Spanish and Portuguese affairs, and be grounded in the relevant literature. Proposals should be sent to the co-Editors: Dr Georgina Blakeley (g.blakeley at open.ac.uk) and Dr Fernando León-Solis (Fernando.leon-solis at uws.ac.uk).

Prospective guest-editors are welcome to approach the co-Editors with a proposal for a themed issue.

In addition, an Open section offering a forum for shorter comment on contemporary events, trends and debates, interviews, obituaries and key documents, contributes to IJIS’s mission to stimulate scholarly interest in Spain and Portugal as complex societies with growing international profiles. Prospective contributors should submit material to:

Dr Jared Larson jared.larson@humboldt.edu.

Book reviewers and publishers should approach directly, the following review editors:

Review Editor (Spain): Dr Esther Gimeno Ugalde  esther.gimeno.ugalde@bc.edu     or

Review Editors (Portugal): Dr Teresa Pinheiro teresa.pinheiro@phil.tu-chemnitz.de

IJIS publishes predominantly in English with a limited selection of articles in Spanish or Portuguese. IJIS selects research articles through a double-blind peer review process that seeks to be inclusive, within scholarly parameters. Our aim is to publish accepted articles within 6-9 months of initial submission.

Back issues of the journal can be ordered by sending a cheque made out to ACIS for £5 per issue to the Editor at the address below. Overseas orders are free.

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Co Editors

Dr Georgina Blakeley (g.blakeley@open.ac.uk)

Dr Fernando León-Solis (Fernando.leon-solis@uws.ac.uk)

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Notes for Contributors

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1) Criteria for articles

Research Articles will be evaluated by double-blind peer review. Open Forum articles will not be subject to peer-review but require approval by a reader other than the Editor.

Research articles should:

* Contain original research or scholarship
* Not be under consideration by any other publication
* Not normally exceed 8000 words
* Be written in a clear and concise style
* Have the ‘check spelling’ and ‘check grammar’ options clicked ON (in Word > Preferences) and all possible red and green underlining removed.

Open Forum pieces can be of variable length up to 4000 words, and be written in a particularly clear, concise and readable style (while avoiding slang).

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2) Confidentiality and extra information for submission:

* Submissions to IJIS should be sent as an attachment to an email message to the Editor. The attached article should be ‘anonymised’ by removing your name and institution from the Properties function in the File drop Menu. Be sure to add your full name, status, institutional affiliation & address in the email message to the Editor.
* Your submission whether research article or Open Forum contribution, must contain an abstract and up to 6 keywords. This is to maintain confidentiality during peer review.
* Your research article must contain an Introduction and a subheading indicating where the Introduction ends. It must also contain a subheading Conclusion to show where the conclusions start. If accepted it will require a list of Works Cited containing only sources cited in the article (even if the paper is first submitted with footnotes). Accepted papers with footnotes will have to remove all bibliographical material from these and transfer it to a Works Cited list. Even if submitting with footnotes in the first instance, you must follow the ‘transparency of sources’ conventions explained below.

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3) Data required before publication of any article:

Articles accepted for publication cannot be sent to the publishers (Intellect) until they contain:

* A spelling and grammar checked Word document where all the red and green underlining has disappeared except for foreign and proper names.
* Correct Harvard system references [see below for details]
* Author name and institutional affiliation
* Abstract (max. 150 words) in English
* Keywords (max. 6) in English
* Author biography (c. 50-100w.) in English

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4) Formatting

* Font should be Times New Roman 14, one-and-a-half-spaces and left-aligned, not justified.
* Margins should be 1 inch/2.5 cm all round
* Pagination should be continuous with numbers applied top right.
* Images – tables, photographs, graphs, and graphics – should all be inserted in the text, entitled ‘Figure’ and numbered consecutively. The source must be indicated below each. If images are more than a page of A4 in size, or are set up horizontally, they may be placed at the end of the text. Indicate where in the text they are being discussed [Insert Figure 3 here]. SEE BELOW FOR DETAILS
* Short Quotations should be identified by ‘single’ quotation marks. Longer quotations (more than 45 words) should be indented on both sides, without quotes. Both should be referenced using the Harvard system (see below), and their source’s page number(s) included.Foreign words and phrases inserted in the text should be in italics but not foreign institutional names.

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5) Endnotes, References and Citations

* IJIS uses the Harvard style for in-text citations, and prints explanatory notes in the margins of the pages of IJIS. Therefore notes must be kept short as the space is limited.
* For explanatory notes, use the Word (or equivalent) ‘Footnote’ facility and ensure that they are submitted as Endnotes, not footnotes. These notes should not contain any publication details. Place endnote marks outside the punctuation (after the comma or full-stop). The note mark must be in superscripted Arabic (1, 2, 3), not Roman (i, ii, iii).
* In-text references should use the ‘Harvard system/style’ (author + year: page), e.g. (Preston 1986: 84) inserted into the text.

All references must identify an author (surname or institution name) for all documents, whether found in archives, newspapers, the internet, etc. The ‘author’ for a Law or Bill will be the legislative body/parliament of a country, e.g. Congreso de los Diputados. The author of a poll or survey is the polling organisation. The author of a news item is the journalist (his/her by-line) or the news agency, not the newspaper.

* Works Cited list: Each Harvard-style reference should be fully sourced in the ‘Works Cited’ at the end of the text. Publications not mentioned in the text should not be included in this list, though they may be included under a separate ‘Further Reading’ list.

Format for Citing a Book:
Author surname, Initial (year), Title in italics, Place of publication: Publisher.
e.g. Preston, P. (1986), The Triumph of Democracy in Spain, London: Methuen.

Format for Citing an Article:
Author surname, Initial (year) ‘Title in single quotation marks’, Name of journal in italics, volume number: issue number (and/or month or quarter), page numbers (first and last of entire article). For example,
Corkill, D. (1992) ‘Imperfect bipolarism? Portugal’s political system after the 1991 parliamentary election’, ACIS, 5: 2 (Spring), pp. 20–34.

Format for Citing a Web publication or website news item:
Websites should be referenced as publishers of material: a separate author and the title of the information/document/pdf article should be supplied:
e.g. Gentile, A. (2003) ‘En las tramas del McJob: descualificación laboral y riesgos de vulnerabilidad social para los trabajadores de fast food’, Documento de Trabajo del Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, UPC 03-13, http://www.iesam.csic.es/doctrab.htm.

If it is a website news article with no by-line, the day/month/year of its initial publication must be given, and website becomes the author.

If the website is the ‘home site’ of an organization publishing its own material without a by-line, the organization should appear as the author.
e.g. PSOE (2004) ‘Zapatero pide al PSOE que sea la voz de los ciudadanos’, News item 2 February 2004, [note: Zapatero speaks but is not the author] http://36congreso.psoe.es/index.php?inc=elemento_actualidad&n=568.

Should the web material be of the type that might be removed from a site in the near future and become irretrievable (ie many or most), authors are advised to include the date they accessed it, to support the authenticity of the source, especially if it is contestable.

Citing printed Newspapers and online articles from El Mundo, El País etc:

* All newspaper articles should be referenced by their authors if they sign/by-line it, i.e. Surname, Initial (Year) ‘Headline title’, Newspaper Title, date of publication, page reference, e.g. Herrero, P. (2005) ‘Iraq en llamas: se acerca la guerra civil’, El Sur, 15/10/2005, p. 15.
* If the page number is missing online, substitute it with the URL if possible.
* NB. Newspapers can only be the authors of their editorials, eg. El País (2005) ‘Más sensatez’, editorial, 20/11/2005, p.7.

Citing personal communications and interviews

(a) Personal communications are what the informant said directly to the author, e.g.
“Bloggs thought this was a good thing (personal communication)”. This need have no citation in the references list. Equally the use of (personal communications) need not refer back to a named informant, though the trend towards greater transparency makes it desirable unless it breaks confidentiality.

(b) A more formal research interview can be cited in the text (García 12/08/04 interview), and at the end of the Works Cited list under Interviews.

(c) If the informant gave an interview to someone else, which is being cited, then the author should cite the informant and the interviewer eg.(González, entrevistado por Fernando Claudín 1979) in the text, and reference it as: Claudín, F. (1979) ‘Entrevista a Felipe González’, Madrid: Zona Abierta Nr. 20, pp.1-10. The point is for another person to be able to find the interview, so keep to the format in which the interview was first published. In this case, the interviewee’s name appears in the title of the article, which shows he is not the author — because the interviewer is. However, note it could be the other way round.

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6) Images and Captions for your text

Images and illustrations are welcome, especially in discussions of buildings or landscapes. They should be submitted with your initial version of the article. Captions should be added, and their source indicated at the foot. Copyright clearance (‘Reproduced with the permission of …’) should be added by the contributor and is always the responsibility of the contributor.

All non-text material should be numbered in sequence as Figure 1, Figure 2, etc. If a full page large or set up horizontally, place them at the end of the text, and add [Figure 1 about here] to indicate their place in the text.

Reproduction will be in greyscale (‘black-and-white’). Hard copy prints, preferably in greyscale, should be between 10–20 cms wide. Colour prints, transparencies, slides, and small images can also be submitted if need be. Photocopies of photographs are never advisable, but may be okay for diagrams. Line drawings, maps, and diagrams should be crisp, clear and in a camera-ready state, capable of scanning and reduction.

Images supplied electronically need to have a resolution of at least 12 dpm (dots per milimetre) – or 300 dpi (dots per inch). The figure showing the number of pixels across the width of the image, a figure independent of milimetres, centimetres or inches, is reached by multiplying the width of the image in milimetres required for reproduction in the journal by 12, or in inches by 300. This is the actual information available that allows the production team to offset resolution (dpm or dpi) lable that allows the production team to offset resolution (dpm or dpi) against width.

Four widths of images that fit well in the journal:
145mm = The width of an image across the whole page, including the text and the side note column. Used when there is a particular need to give a landscape image a large format.
110mm = The usual option for landscape images, but it can also be applied to some portrait images.
53mm = Covers a half column in the text. Used primarily when the image is portrait, especially if it is particularly high with respect to the width, or if the resolution of a supplied landscape image is so low that it
requires the width to be minimized.
53-110mm = A compromise: the image frame is 110mm and the image is centred within the box. Applied when an image does not have the resolution for 110mm width but where a 53mm width would severely compromise its ability to illustrate the article.
Image width (mm) – Pixels in width:
145-1740 , 110 – 1320, 53 – 636, 53–110, 636–1320

These figures would give a resolution of 12 dots per milimetre, or 300 dots per inch, which is the ideal minimum. If the ‘pixels in width’ figure falls below 636, it is possible to reproduce at 53mm if the image is thought to be essential and cannot be submitted at a higher resolution, but the quality will go down in the printed form. Images sent in as e-mail attachments should be greyscale to save time uploading and downloading.

Reproducing text within images supplied separately is difficult: they need a high final resolution – around 48 dpm. An additional Acrobat PDF document is encouraged. The PDF is a good proof copy that can also be used for reproduction if the table is exactly as it should be, but if editing is necessary, this can be done in Word if there is a small spelling error or if a statistical error is identified later.

Diagrams are difficult to construct in Word, so an object-oriented computer application is better than a text-oriented one. Diagrams can be supplied to us as JPEG, TIFF, or Acrobat PDF documents. If a mistake is identified in a diagram, make the amendments and re-supply.

7) Consent to Publish & Transfer of Copyright Agreement

Please print, sign and return this form to the publishers, Intellect, at the address indicated.

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Co-Editorship of the International Journal of Iberian Studies

Second Call for Expressions of Interest/Applications

Deadline: Monday 15 May 2017

IJIS Editor 2nd Call